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Diseases Caused From Benzene

Aplastic Anemia

Also called bone marrow aplasia, aplastic anemia causes your bone marrow's production of blood cells to decrease. This causes a gradual or sudden reduction in the number of blood cells in your bloodstream. The bone marrow in your body is in essence a blood cell factory. Continuous production of blood cells is necessary because each cell once it leaves the bone marrow and enters the bloodstream has a short life span. Red blood cells last 120 days, platelets last 6 days and white blood cells last one day or less. The main risks associated with aplastic anemia are infection and bleeding, both of which may be severe enough to threaten your life.

Aplastic Anemia - Bone Marrow Aplasia

Myelodysplastic Syndromes

Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) are clonal diseases of stem cells characterized by single or multilinease cytopenia and various bone marrow abnormalities. Up to 35% of MDS patients progress of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) within a few months of initial diagnosis and the MDS has sometimes been characterized as a preleukemic condition or simply "preleukemia."

Myelodysplastic Syndromes - Preleukemia

Multiple Myeloma

In general, causal associations for multiple myeloma have been reported in workers exposed to petrochemicals, especially those occupationally exposed to benzene, a known human carcinogen and leukemogen. In addition to chemical workers, elevated risks of multiple myeloma have been reported among farmers and others engaged in agricultural operations, metal workers, rubber manufacturing workers and painters. All of these occupations entail exposure to such benzene-containing products, i.e., gasoline or organic solvents. The epidemiologic literature shows that benzene is the chemical most strongly associated with multiple myeloma.

Multiple Myeloma - Kahler's Disease

Multiple Myeloma Symptoms

Also known as Kahler's disease, multiple myeloma is a subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. It is a cancer of the plasma cells. These cells cause destruction of bone, resulting in bone pain, hypercalcemia, compression, fractures, spinal cord compression, hemiparesis, and paraplegia. The disease is treatable, but essentially incurable. Virtually all patients with multiple myeloma succumb to their malignancy.

Multiple myeloma is a disease of old age. The median age at diagnosis is 72. Mortality rates have been rising since the 1950s. The increase in the incidence of multiple myeloma was among the highest for any cancer during this period. Approximately 12,000 new cases are diagnosed annually.


Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the blood. There are many types of leukemia. However, AML is the type of leukemia that is most strongly associated with benzene exposure. While some experts dispute that benzene causes certain types of leukemia, all medical and scientific experts agree that benzene causes AML. If you have been diagnosed with AML and have an occupational history of exposure to solvents or fuels, your leukemia may well have been caused by benzene.

  • MO - AML without differentiation
  • M1 - AML with Minimal Maturation
  • M2 - AML with Maturation
  • M3 - Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia
  • M4 - Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia
  • M5 - Acute Monocytic Leukemia
  • M6 - Acute Erythroid Leukemia
  • M7 - Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia
Acute Myeloid Leukemia - AML Leukemia

If you have had occupational or other exposure to benzene and you develop any of the seven types of AML, or if a loved one had benzene exposure and died from one of the seven types of AML, you may have a case.


Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has been reported in workers exposed to pure benzene and benzene containing chemicals such as gasoline, crude oil, toluene, naphtha, xylene and other solvents. The epidemiologic literature shows that benzene is the chemical most strongly associated with CLL. CLL is a form of leukemia that starts from white blood cells called lymphocytes in the bone marrow but then go into the blood.

Acute Lymphocytic (or Lymphoblastic) Leukemia (ALL)

Acute Lymphocytic (or Lymphoblastic) Leukemia (ALL)

Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia and has been reported in workers exposed to pure benzene and benzene containing chemicals such as gasoline, crude oil, toluene, naphtha, xylene and other solvents. The epidemiologic literature shows that benzene is the chemical most strongly associated with ALL. ALL is a form of leukemia that starts from white blood cells called lymphocytes in the bone marrow but then go into the blood quickly. These cells spread to other parts of the body, including the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen.

Acute Lymphocytic (or Lymphoblastic) Leukemia (ALL)

Chronic Myeloid (or Myelogenous) Leukemia (CML)

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is also called chronic myelogenous leukemia. CML is a type of cancer that starts in certain cells of the bone marrow. The leukemia cells grow and divide in the bone marrow and spread into the blood. CML is a slow growing leukemia, but it can also change into a fast-growing acute leukemia. CML has been reported in workers exposed to pure benzene and benzene containing chemicals such as gasoline, crude oil, toluene, naphtha, xylene and other solvents. The epidemiologic literature shows that benzene is the chemical most strongly associated with CML.

Chronic Myeloid (or Myelogenous) Leukemia (CML)

Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (NHL)

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), also referred to, as just lymphoma is a cancer that starts in cells called lymphocytes, which are part of the body’s immune system. Lymphocytes are in the lymph nodes and other lymphoid tissues including the spleen and bone marrow. NHL has been reported in workers exposed to pure benzene and benzene containing chemicals such as gasoline, crude oil, toluene, naphtha, xylene and other solvents. The epidemiologic literature shows that benzene is the chemical most strongly associated with NHL.

Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (NHL)

Childhood Leukemia

Leukemia can be acute (fast growing) or chronic (slow growing). Almost all childhood leukemias are acute. Acute lymphocytic (lymphoblastic) leukemia (ALL) accounts for 3 out of 4 childhood leukemias. This leukemia starts from early forms of lymphocytes in the bone marrow. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) accounts for most of the remaining cases of childhood leukemias. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are rare in children. Childhood leukemia has been reported in children exposed to benzene containing chemicals such as gasoline, crude oil, toluene, naphtha, xylene, other solvents, pesticides and insecticides. The epidemiologic literature shows that benzene is the chemical most strongly associated with childhood leukemias. Children exposed to household chemicals such as gasoline, pesticides, and insecticides or that live near gas stations, refineries, chemical plants or other industrial locations have shown an increase in childhood leukemias.

Childhood Cancer - Leukemia


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